Author Topic: Is Qigong for You? by Arthur Rosenfeld  (Read 3473 times)

Michael

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Is Qigong for You? by Arthur Rosenfeld
« on: March 28, 2011, 02:32:32 AM »
Arthur Rosenfeld
Novelist, philosopher, martial arts teacher.
for the Huffington Post
Posted: March 26, 2011 12:09 PM

If you've traveled to China, you've likely encountered senior citizens flapping their arms early in the morning in public parks, or perhaps squatting, walking, singing or dancing in groups, twisting waists and wiggling hips and watching their own hands while performing repetitive movements. Most likely, these folks were engaging in their morning qigong.

Ranging from simple to quite complex, this popular mind-body exercise represents a uniquely Chinese method of uniting good intentions with specific results. Because it is more accessible and less challenging than practices like tai chi or yoga -- and takes far less time to learn -- it is growing in popularity among New Agers, the alternative medicine crowd and just about anyone whose mind is more open than their wallet when it comes to taking good care of themselves.

The word "qigong" (pronounced "chee gung") is a composite of two Chinese characters, the first meaning energy ("qi") and the second meaning work ("gong"). Transliteration from Chinese to English presents certain difficulties, but the word "gong" in this context is the same as the word "kung" in "kung fu," which connotes the sort of Chinese martial arts associated with movie star Bruce Lee, but literally means "hard work." Qigong thus evokes working on the body's energy system using movement, breath, mind and sound.
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Saber

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Re: Is Qigong for You? by Arthur Rosenfeld
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2011, 10:31:48 AM »
Excellent article to refer to those who might be interested in qi gong's potential.  Many people seem to need a more practical way to relate to qi gong training.  The Medical Qigong book is rather expensive, but most will gain from reading the article.  There is a learning  principle involved here.  A person will decide to learn something new when they have a certain amount of information that supports their perceived needs.  With qigong even the terminology is new and unknown.  We make analogies like "Chinese yoga" to explain it. Of course many do not know what yoga is either, but at least they have seen some pictures of attractive people standing and stretching.  Thanks for the reference.
Qifully, George

Jiegang

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Re: Is Qigong for You? by Arthur Rosenfeld
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2011, 01:07:53 AM »
Speaking of qi gong, Master Ou has also written a series of articles about this topic which can be found here:
http://www.pangu.org/english/article/index.html

Michael

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Re: Is Qigong for You? by Arthur Rosenfeld
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2011, 01:54:57 AM »
Quote
The Medical Qigong book is rather expensive, but most will gain from reading the article.
I don't think such reference books would be useful to the average qigong teacher or student. Most people are not that technical in their knowledge and PGSG isn't taught that way, although there are certainly lots of Chinese Medicine doctors and others who are PGSG students who would probably enjoy the detailed information. For anyone on the East Coast of the USA, PGSG teacher and Chinese Medicine Doctor Paul Fraser offers medical qigong classes and PGSG teacher and Chinese Medicine Doctor Henry McAnn also offers classes.

I've got a book that is more of a practical guide to dealing with sports injuries with good information on certain acupuncture points that are "master points" for various joints (ankles, hip, knees, shoulders, etc.). You can send qi and cure a sprain before it really becomes a problem if you catch it in the first few hours. It's useful information, but it seems most PGSG students are not inclined to use such techniques, probably because they don't have any foundation in Chinese Medicine or don't have a basis for confidence in a new technique without some additional training, which is understandable.

Much like learning the Healing Skill, sending qi to a particular place on someone's body is easy, and for certain injuries or acute symptoms, it's much more effective than the basic way of sending qi to someone that is non-specific to the area of their body. The book is A Tooth from the Tiger's Mouth by Tom Bisio and it's probably $10-15 online.

I often go hiking with friends who sometimes sprain their ankles and with information from that book on where the "master point" of the ankle is located, I just send qi there for a minute and it's like their painful sprain never happened. More serious injuries require some kind of doctor, but the most common types without broken bones, dislocations, or tears can be cured in a few minutes. Depending on your preferred way of sending qi, you don't even need to touch the patient on their "master point", it's really just all in your mind if you can do it that way. Takes some practice, but you can practice on yourself and there's no risk.

There's a lot of individual variation in how to send qi, and I've seen people who need the recipient to be on the phone, or in the same room, or whatever, which is fine, but if you watch how Teacher Ou does it, he just uses his mind and rarely uses physical touch. No props, no phones, etc. It really all happens in the mind.

Quote
We make analogies like "Chinese yoga" to explain it. Of course many do not know what yoga is either, but at least they have seen some pictures of attractive people standing and stretching.
I don't always know the best way to introduce the topic of qigong to people who have no previous experience. I've tried a lot of analogies and metaphors to explain qigong, but I recall that I was willing to try it because even though I couldn't understand Cantonese, when I first saw Teacher Ou I felt he was confident and sincere.  So now I just offer some basic information and answer any questions. Sometimes, after answering lots of questions, I eventually tell people they will have to try it to find out what it means, and that requires a relatively small investment in time and money.

The price of learning the Moving Form has actually gone down since I've been in China, while food and housing has doubled or more, so when people aren't willing to spend the amount of money on trying qigong that they would spend on a nice lunch or two taxi rides, then I know it's just not the right time for them, or maybe I'm not the right teacher, or whatever. I used to worry that somebody missed a chance to help themselves, but now I know it's out of my hands. I offered, they didn't want it, it's okay.

rliang

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Jiegang

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Re: Is Qigong for You? by Arthur Rosenfeld
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2012, 01:55:20 AM »
Really good article, thank you for sharing rliang!

Michael

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Re: Is Qigong for You? by Arthur Rosenfeld
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2012, 07:51:34 AM »
Yes, I enjoyed hearing about that. Very sweet.